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CARF_14ACC’s Behavioral Health Division is a comprehensive community-based, outpatient program, accredited by the Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission (CARF) since 1992 and committed to the prevention and treatment of psychological and social problems in the Arab-American, Chaldean, and mainstream community.  The mission of the Behavioral Health Program, which was reaccredited by CARF in 2013, is to improve the quality of life of those individuals who seek its assistance.  ACC helps consumers develop their inner potential and empowers them to become valuable and productive members of the community.

ACC is committed to providing comprehensive, culturally sensitive and competent outpatient behavioral health services that are cost effective, consumer-driven and represent the highest standards of the profession.  ACC’s five conveniently located outpatient clinics in Oakland, Macomb, and Wayne counties offer quality behavioral health services. Services include:

Ø  Psychiatric Assessment and Consultation
Ø  Psycho-social Assessment
Ø  Psychological Testing and Evaluation
Ø  Psychopharmacological Treatment / Medication Review
Ø  Case Management
Ø  Individual, Marital and Family Counseling
Ø  Crisis Intervention
Ø  Adult Foster Care Home Placement and Monitoring
Ø  Grief Counseling
Ø  Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment
Ø  Community Outreach
Ø  Education and Advocacy
Ø  Cultural Competency and Sensitivity Training
Ø  Co-Occurring Treatment for Dually-Diagnosed patients
Ø  Vocational Rehabilitation Services
Ø  Home-Based Infant Mental Health

In addition to its outpatient clinics, ACC’s Wayne County Network Clubhouse provides psychosocial & vocational rehabilitation while encouraging social reintegration for consumers with reoccurring and long term mental illness, through person centered planned activities. In partnership with Wayne County Community Mental Health Agency, the Clubhouse focuses on building its client’s strengths, independent living skills, and develops employment opportunities. The aim is to slowly integrate the client into society. The Network Clubhouse believes that its members and staff work in a partnership towards mutual support, delivering high quality services to its members.

Over the past year the behavioral health division has expanded its services and office space to better meet the needs of the community. ACC expanded services to include Home-Based Infant Mental Health Services and an Assertive Community Treatment Team.  The Infant Mental Health Program is a Home-Based service that provides therapy and support to parents and infants that address ongoing mental health concerns, infants that suffer from low birth weight, developmental delays, emotional or behavioral problems, or a basic failure to thrive.  By providing weekly in home visits ACC staff are able to provide guidance and support as well as link families to needed community resources.

The Infant Mental Health Program Healthy Baby, Happy Home Program provides home-based services for families with children ages 0-3, including pregnant women. Service include counseling, developmental guidance, social and emotional support, advocacy, diapers, resources and referrals. This program targets parents who are feeling overwhelmed, stressed, depressed, hopeless or angry and those who have infants who are having emotional/behavioral difficulties, growth or development delays, trauma, and trouble eating or sleeping.

ACC’s Wraparound Program is a team planning process for youth of Wayne County between the ages of 7 and 17 that are involved in multiple cares of service. The program’s purpose is to help the youth and their families indentify their family needs and strengths to help the family reach their goals. Each participating family has an ACC Wraparound Facilitator that works directly with them to help develop a vision for the family’s future. ACC’s facilitators are positive, encouraging, open, honest, and work to see the success of each family. Wraparound studies have shown that there is evidence of a greater decline in behavioral symptoms, lower overall impairment, and fewer externalizing, social problems and thought problems. Studies have also shown that children involved in wraparound have missed less days of school. Overall, over the years wraparound has shown many positive outcomes.

Trauma Recovery Center

Trauma Recovery Center of Southeast Michigan was established as a joint venture involving Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences its clinical service group (Wayne State University Physician Group-Psychiatry) and the ACC.

The goal of the Trauma Recovery Center is to help torture survivors and their families recover from the physical and emotional effects caused by torture. We believe that survivors of torture are strong and resilient individuals who can recover from the traumas that they have endured. Our programs’ mission is to assist in that process of rebuilding their lives in many different ways.

The Center is organized to assist survivors of torture and war trauma, and their families, to heal and rebuild their lives. A variety of services are offered, including:

Ø  Information and Referrals
Ø  Screening and Assessment
Ø  Individual and Group Counseling
Ø  Psychiatric Services
Ø  Care coordination for healthcare, legal, and other supportive services

The staff and program design offers a high level of expertise in health care, mental health, case management, social services, vocational, and legal aid to assist individuals who have experienced unimaginable trauma to re-establish hope and trust; to build a life by calling upon personal strengths and courage with the support and caring of the community and The Center.

What is torture?

Torture is an act committed by a person inteded to inflict severe physical and/or mental pain due to their political beliefs, religion, race, ethnicity or membership in a social group.

What a person has gone through

An individual may have been beaten, deprived of food and water, denied hygienic conditions, burned, humiliated and been the victim of may other horrible acts. The spirit of the person has been beaten down as well. The torture survivor is just what the word survivor implies. They are strong and courageous individuals who have used their inner strength to leave their country, their families and their way of life.

How treatment can help?

The Trauma Recovery Center aims to provide a variety of services to lessen the effects of  the torture experience. Some of the things that survivors can get assistance with are an evaluation of the effects of torture, medical treatment or referral for medical treatment, legal referrals, assistance obtaining social services for work, food, shelter, education and other survival needs.

In addition, The Center is pursuing building the capacity of other providers to respond to the needs of torture survivors. By enhancing and building service capacity through training and education of health care professionals, community resources are established to assist the large number of individuals needing support and healing in Southeast Michigan.

ACCREDITATION

National Core Indicator (NCI) Report
The National Core Indicators (NCI) project is a joint venture between the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services (NASDDDS), and the Human Services Research Institute (HSRI).  The NCI framework includes approximately 100 performance and outcome indicators organized across five broad domains: Individual Outcomes, Health Welfare & Rights, Staff Stability & Competency, Family Outcomes, and System Performance. The criteria and design provide Michigan with indicators that are reliable measures and are important to all individuals served, regardless of level of disability or residential setting.

Funded by Detroit-Wayne County Community Mental Health Agency, Macomb County Community Mental Health Services, and the Oakland County Community Mental Health Authority


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